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PEOPLE SKILLS ARE AS IMPORTANT AS LEGAL SKILLS

In a lawyer role, people are required to interact with a huge diversity of stakeholders from employers, partners and financial clients. Consider how many talented lawyers are out there and you will realize how a lawyer services his/her client can be a game changer in terms of ongoing client relationship. Poor people skills lead to poor service and most clients place a very high value on quality legal services.

When looking for a lawyer, clients are expecting:

 

  • Understanding of their business
  • Better Communications
  • No surprises
  • Prompt Billing
  • Greater Value
  • Security

 

However, when time is squeezed by huge workloads and client demands, it mutes lawyer`s people skills. The higher a lawyer`s workload is, the harder it is for him/her to slow down and know what the client is going through. We all know that sometimes people are hard to understand and the most critical thing that isn’t trained into lawyers is interpersonal flexibility. Since that is a core emotional intelligence skill, here is a list of some important people skills that every lawyer should work on:

  • Have a sense of humor
  • Ask about client’s work routine
  • Learn about their personal life (as appropriate)
  • Build trust
  • Accept people have weaknesses and sometimes they are emotional and unpredictable
  • Know what keeps your clients up at night
  • Ask what are their preferred manner for receiving updates

 

In today`s competitive marketplace, those skills are as important as how smart a lawyer is.

6 Social Media Myths Debunked

There’s no question that Social Media has become one of, if not the top platform for increasing brand awareness and audience engagement in today’s age.

Although any brand can make a social media page, many harbor several misconceptions about how to succeed on social media.

Here’s 6 of the top social media myths many brands believe and how to debunk them

 

MYTH 1: If you aren’t on every social media platform your brand won’t succeed.

A company never needs to be active on all social media sites. Instead, companies should be active on the platforms that work for them and make sense for their brand. Your brand needs to focus on where its reach will be most effective and hone in on these platforms.

 

MYTH 2: Publish as much content as possible and your audience will engage.

With millions of blogs posted, tweets exchanged, and purchases made online daily, standing out among the endless posts is crucial. It’s not enough to just be posting, it’s more important than ever to be engaging with your audiences. Replying to comments, reaching out to customers who have recently purchased your product, etc. It’s beneficial to have a content extension team to reach out to audiences and ensure the reach your target audience needs to take action.

 

MYTH 3: Repost your content. Everywhere.

While it is true that only a small portion of your social media audience is going to see your live content, reposting the exact same content over and over again and posting it on every. Single. One. Of your social media platforms runs the risk of pushing your followers to unfollowing you. Be wary of reposting the same content over and over and everywhere.Social media posts attracting more engagement when they contain other forms of media (videos, photos, GIFs, storyboards, etc.) Mix up your content and your audience will be satisfied.

 

MYTH 4: Social media is the best tool to gain new customers.

In most cases, your primary audience on social will be current or past customers. Looking to drive loyalty through repeat purchases and brand ambassadorship through social endorsement is key. It’s counterproductive to expect social media to be a primary driver of sales for new customers. View social media as a means of cultivating customer retention and increasing brand loyalty.

 

MYTH 5: Social media is solely for increasing sales.

If your first goal of creating a social media page is increasing sales, put that idea back into the box. Your primary goal should always be to increase engagement with your audience. There is great value in offering your audience content that helps them succeed. Sometimes that content is going to be a solution in the form of a product or service. But keep relationship-building and community building front and center of your strategy. Content marketing pieces should relate to your business, but not always be about your business.

 

MYTH 6: The more followers the better.

The belief that bigger is better leads brands to put a follower count above all else when it comes to success metrics, as many brands are beginning to buy followers. There is little to no value in buying/attracting followers who have no interest in your brand or are inactive accounts. Even if small at first, it’s best to cater to a following that is genuinely interested in your brand and your brand’s social media.

The Great American Eclipse is finally here!

The U.S. experienced The Great American Eclipse today and our team was able to watch this wondrous spectacle! It was the first total solar eclipse in the continental U.S. in 38 years and the National Geographic called it “the most amazing celestial disappearing act seen since 1979”.

The eclipse fever was contagious and it reached coast to coast, from Oregon to South Carolina. During a span of almost two hours, 14 states experienced more than two minutes of darkness in the middle of the day. This happens because the moon completely covers the sun and the sun’s tenuous atmosphere can be seen.

San Diego is out of the path for a total eclipse, so the moon here covered part of the sun’s disk. Its maximum point of visibility occurred at 10:23am. Even during a partial solar eclipse, it is still extremely important to view it safely because the eclipse viewing glasses avoid permanently damage on your eyes.

We hope you didn’t miss it, because we won’t see another solar eclipse in San Diego until 2023.

The 3 Best Marketing Practices That Your Legal Firm Must Adopt

Surprisingly, the legal industry is absolutely crushing content marketing. Legal firms are coming out on top and adopting a well-thought out strategy to ensure quality content that is timely, compelling and relevant.

While major firms are blogging about intellectual property right concerns, new SEC regulations, data privacy and other trending legal topics, consumer-facing firms blog posts range from DUI records to immigration cases.

Constantly posting about hot topics and using a smart content strategy is an absolute must for law firms to reach new clients. Since people normally turn to Google for information about an immigration case, a felony conviction or a fallout from an old DUI, publishing engaging content answering these questions can raise law firms profile and establish themselves as local leaders.

If you are looking to acquire new clients, invest in legal content marketing and keep these best practices in mind:

  • Keep it real.

Focus on having a dialogue with your audience rather than talking at them. Marketers and lawyers tend to fall back into industry speak and throw around a lot of lingo. The problem with speaking in a lot of indecipherable “legalese” is that it sounds like an alphabet soup to outsiders and alienates the readers.

Therefore, when writing a blog post about the legal industry, keep your audience in mind and balance a professional tone with approachable content. It is also important to use examples and a touch of humor when appropriate. Remember: a blog is not a college term paper.

  • Thought leadership over advertising.

Publishing misleading and incorrect legal information could lead to a possible lawsuit! Although legal blogs are not meant to substitute legal consultation, they are a trusted resource for gathering information. Your company`s content marketing plan must follow the path of thought leadership rather than advertising services, which means it has no place for inaccurate information.

In order to create a recognized law firm blog, conduct market intelligence research to understand what topics are most important for your customers and create content that addresses these concerns with action-oriented solutions. Remember not to push your own products and services!

  • Hijack the news.

When it comes to producing a stream of timely content, lawyers are lucky. They often get built-in news hooks like a major court ruling or new regulation announcement to comment on in their posts. However, if you don’t have that to cover, you can still find current events to “newsjack” in your content.

You don’t have to shape an entire blog post or article around those events or breaking news, but you can use these topics as “hooks” to publicize your content.

Bottom line:

Major law firms have some serious cash to invest in advertising; that’s why it’s even more noteworthy that they’re choosing to invest this money in content marketing rather than print or TV ads. Don’t have the marketing budget of a corporate law firm? Be sure you’re getting the biggest bang for your buck by adopting these smart content marketing strategies and keeping tabs on your expected return via a marketing ROI calculator.

7 Most Common Mistakes When Writing a Professional Bio

All professionals and business leaders should have a well-written bio that recounts their career accomplishments. A brief bio is essential for social media profiles, company Web sites, press releases, event programs, brochures and more. In reality, a professional bio is nothing to be afraid of—as long as you avoid a few common mistakes.

 

  1. Writing in the First Person

Even if you’re writing your own bio, refer to yourself in the third person. Whoever the subject is, call them by their full name the first time you mention them and just their last name on subsequent references.

  1. Starting at the beginning

Like resumes, bios should generally start with the present and work backwards in chronological order. The purpose of a bio is to describe what sets the subject apart professionally. For most people, that’s going to be the major accomplishments of their adult life. That’s why it’s a good idea to begin with a summary statement that includes the subject’s current position or occupation as well as their most significant recent accomplishment.

  1. “Fluff”

There’s no need to add extraneous information to make a bio longer. Three or four paragraphs is a sufficient amount to describe the major milestones of most people’s careers.

  1. Providing too much information

Remember, it’s called a professional bio for a reason. It’s fine to briefly mention a few personal details such as college and graduate school degrees, charitable activities, hobbies and passions in the last sentence or two.

  1. Lying

A bio should never include fabricated accomplishments, awards, titles or positions. Besides the moral issue, false claims are easy to disprove and the potential fallout from getting caught in a lie outweighs any benefits of exaggerating one’s achievements.

  1. Modesty

There’s no reason to down play any major accomplishments. Remember to include professional awards, accolades, honorary degrees, titles, etc. And never mention anything negative or unflattering.

  1. Humor

Avoid the temptation to be sarcastic or humorous. Humor and sarcasm rarely work in a professional bio. Unless you are a paid comedy writer and the bio is used to promote a comedic project. It’s best to just stick to the facts.

Avoid these mistakes and you will produce a better bio.

4 Reasons Why PR must balance screen time with face time

The digital media has shaped our lives and redefined human connection and communication. One study has shown that the average mobile device user checks his/her phone approximately 40 times a day. The ability to communicate without any limitation of time and distance has made us hyper-connected. As a PR pro, we have to consume media and be aware of latest news, so why check out? Stepping away from the screen can seem counterintuitive but we must learn the importance of balancing screen time with face time. Here are 4 reasons why every PR pro should find a healthy balance with both:

1) That balance starts with environment

The first step to finding a balance between screen and face communication is to practice what we preach for better communication. The PR industry is rooted in the ability to successfully interface with an audience and equally with the person sitting in the next chair. When spending most of our day at the office, an entire day may pass without even acknowledging our coworkers. Sometimes we send emails for things that could easily have been addressed in person.

As a result of the evolution of communication dynamics within company cultures, a common tendency in the office environment is for everyone to enter individual zones. While it might seem a highly efficient way to get work done, it also tells us our relationship with digital media.

2) It boils down to convenience

Every PR professional has to know exactly what we want to say and when it needs to be said. Therefore, sending a text or an email is easier and comes with a sense of security. There are no long pauses or questions to catch anyone off guard and you are able to re-read a message 5 times over before sending it. Each concept and phrase has been thought through and the words are tailored to convey exactly what they’re meant to.

Communicating, pitching or promoting through a screen feels more convenient when any misstep in language could alter the entire meaning of a message.

3) Creating a balance seems simple

Try to set up a meeting over breakfast instead of a conference call. Put the effort to schedule a dinner rather than check in via email. Making more time for face-to-face communication is key to foster relationships, build a good network and grow your business.

However, everyone in the PR industry is eager to see results and are too busy to be in touch with 10 different clients, 40 different reports and still find time within the day to eat and (hopefully) sleep.

Although the high level of communication leads us to look for shortcuts, try to remember that a lot of digital communication can be more impactful when delivered in-person.

4) The goal is to create opportunity for significant conversation

Quantity doesn’t mean quality. What gets said during meetings is far more important than the number of meetings. In order to maintain current relationships and develop new ones, you have to consciously choose to utilize mediums of interactions beyond the digital realm.

Regardless of the setting, transferring a message from one mind to another can be challenging. It is our job in PR to minimize the possibility of misunderstanding and accurate interpretation is more likely with physical presence.

Remember: although our preferred method might be the written word, a face makes more of an impression than an email signature.