Putting an End to The Lies That Hinder Creativity - Heying
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Putting an End to The Lies That Hinder Creativity

“We have reached a limits of what is possible with computers.”

“Remote shopping, while entirely feasible, will flop – because women like to get out of the house, like to handle merchandise, like to be able to change their minds.”

“Everything that can be invented has been invented.”

These are just some of the things inventors were told before coming up with some of the most monumental ideas in history. If they would have believed these lies, we wouldn’t have personal computers or online shopping.

These ideas came from people were willing to take creative risks. By avoiding creativity in the workplace, you are missing opportunities to improve your communication, your business, and your professional reputation.

 

There are three common lies that hinder people from taking creative risks:

 

THE LIE: “I’m not creative.”

THE WHY: Maybe in the past someone dubbed you as “not good” at writing or drawing. More likely, no one ever commented on your creativity. The absence of feedback made you believe that you must not have any creativity at all.

THE TRUTH: Everyone is creative. Creativity is being able to think or do or make something new, which we all do every day.

 

THE LIE: “I don’t have time.”

THE WHY: How often do you use the “no time” excuse without challenging your typical methods? Maybe a new approach would save time, but you wouldn’t know because you don’t want to waste time finding out.

THE TRUTH: Doing things differently – exercising creativity – can actually be faster.

 

THE LIE: “They won’t let me.”

THE WHY: Once upon a time, you were brave enough to go against the flow. You shared your opinion or idea and then you got rejected. So you stopped trying because you believed “they” would only accept status quo.

THE TRUTH: They will let you and they might be wishing you would. When faced with opposition, you should absolutely listen to their rationale—but don’t stop there. Provide evidence and sell your approach.

 

Stop telling lies. Don’t say them to yourself and don’t say them to others. Instead, tell the truth: “I am creative. I do have time. They will let me.”